In other words, stop worrying and love the bomb. Yes, I’m quoting Dr. Strangelove for reason (if you haven’t seen it, drop everything and watch it. And thank me later).

We are living in the golden age of the internet though, but perhaps not for long. Granted, the overall amount of freedom we’ve had has changed in the past decade or so – punk 90s kids stand up! – but it is definitely still there. But it might not be for much longer. All of the things that people fear about the web seem to be manifesting themselves in the media and causing new calls for future restrictions that aren’t actually beneficial.

Appreciate it while it lasts – and fight to make sure it stays that way. It just takes a few people to care and amplify their voice in order to make a difference. And today’s web has resulted in a remarkable worldwide freedom of speech

Plenty of people more knowledgeable than me have written about net neutrality, freedom of information, and every other topic related to that. But it is important – nay, essential – to add another voice to the conversation.

Keep in mind that an open internet is about a lot more than you – so post about it, share your opinions, and most importantly, join the conversation.

You have more to lose than you even realize. Freedom of information is about a lot than your ability to download music or movies (cause c’mon we all know that there will be new ways to do that even though torrents and other sources get shut down every day – new ones are always gonna pop up).

But not everyone has access to that kind of technology, or if they do they don’t know how to take advantage of it.

And this is about more than just access to various websites, streaming music or TV shows – it is about the ability to access valuable information that could change yours or someone else’s life.

That’s why it is so important.

 

 

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Because I thought it was fitting to re-launch my blog with a shorter reprise of my earlier “100 Things” posts:

1. I am so pleased that SEO has actually become about creating quality content and providing useful information – especially I started in the days where keyword stuffing actually did work.

2. However, the sheer amount of link-building and SEO-centric content is still disappointing – I know everyone wants to get traffic, pageviews, and therefore those sweet advertising dollars and new client prospects. But don’t sacrifice quality. One original article that tells your story is worth a thousand or more crappy re-spun posts.

3. As much as I would like to pretend I am above the typical internet circle jerk sites that all repeat each others’ content, much of which is sourced from Reddit and other forums (sorry not sorry for the language – see what I did there?), I have some respect for them, and occasionally get sucked in by the catchy titles and funny combinations of gifs.

4. That said, I think Reddit might be one of the most valuable sources for inspiration and market research, especially if you look beyond the front page.

5. The fact that “Wasting Time On The Internet” is an actually Ivy League course will never cease to amuse me.

6. So many blogs and even companies try to copy each others’ marketing formulas – more so than ever. Looking at the “Best In Class” sites (however you define that) can be an inspiration, but it definitely doesn’t equal success.

7. The sheer number of ways to curate your experience and the content you receive amazes me – the web has basically become one big “choose your own adventure” game. But the number of users who take advantage of these is still relatively low – perhaps the amount of options are overwhelming and therefore it leads to mental inertia?

8. Pandora tops the mobile listings in regard to user interaction, and it is probably not that far behind for desktop as well. After all, listening to music is a relatively passive activity compared to posting on social media or similar ways to engage on mobile. We’ve come a long way from the days of Napster (yes, I remember and loved using Napster).

9. So many companies either neglect or make a big deal out of the simple things, like claiming all their listings and brand names on various sites, social media and otherwise. Don’t ignore it but don’t make the process overly complex, either.

10. Content discovery can be one of the most valuable aspects of the web in general, but it seems that the majority of people stick to the sites they know and trust.

11. The democratization of not only knowledge but access as well may be how the internet has truly changed the world. Almost anyone, anywhere can make themselves heard with nothing more than a mobile phone.

12. When you find yourself wishing that you could use emojis or gifs in an actual live conversation with another person, perhaps it is time to step away from technology for a bit. Use your words!

13. That said, a properly deployed meme can sometimes say more than words ever could.

14. This isn’t new, but it is underrated. The ability to reference virtually anything in a conversation or article and link right to the source might be my favorite element of the web – it is essentially real time citations on steroids (sans the academic regulations).

 

Now I”ll open it up to comments – what has changed about the web in the past 10 years for you?