I love it when people talk about the different marketing channels like they have nothing to do with each other, then they go home and browse the web while watching TV and listening to the radio and chatting on Facebook, Twitter, et al.

Your audience interacts with your brand as a whole.  The same people reading your blog see your commercials and get your newsletters and watch your YouTube channel.  How they first come across you and/or your company may vary, but their interaction with your brand extends across media.  They’ve already integrated your marketing strategies without your involvement.

File under: painful obviousness, harsh language.

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Yes, this blog has been quiet for a while – but I’ve been busy on Twitter (@jazspin), and I’ve been working on a number of exciting projects that truly exemplify the power and utility of the web.  Watch this space.  That said, it is has been nice getting out of the echo chamber for a while – there are plenty of amazing blogs out there, but there are also plenty that are bandwagon jumpers.  Another testament to the fact that people respond to authentic voices both online and offline.

On a related note, I recently re-read the Cluetrain Manifesto (ten year anniversary edition).  The first time I read it was online, sitting in my parent’s basement and probably signed into AOL chat talking with my friends and downloading music – it was 1999 and I was still in high school (yes, I was that much of a nerd even then).  I would like to think I am perceptive enough to have fully grasped it at the time, but not so much.  I did take away the knowledge that internet was going to change things forever, however, and that it was already making the world that much smaller and more connected.  I also recognized the way that the web opens doors – a realization that I did not fully take advantage of until I started my first blog, an endeavor that led to a gig with AOL, and the rest is history (and fodder for archive.org).

Today, I work on the web, developing interactive campaigns and changing the way businesses operate.  It has been an interesting road, to say the least.  There are days when I think I have to drag people kicking and screaming into the 21st century and days when I am so inspired and excited I want to do some Tom Cruise style couch jumping.  Fortunately, there are many, many more of the latter.

“And I believe that good journalism, good television, can make our world a better place.”

“In emerging democracies like Russia, in authoritarian states like Iran or even Yugoslavia, journalists play a vital role in civil society. In fact, they form the very basis of those new democracies and civil societies.”

– Christiane Amanpour
These two quotes seem particularly apt given recent world events.  And by journalists, I don’t mean just the official press, I mean the courageous citizen journalists like the twitter users who are giving everything they have to make sure the world hears their story and perspective from inside Tehran.

Everyone who doubts the power/usefulness of social media should read Andrew Sullivan’s post, “The Revolution Will Be Twittered“, and then check out the #iranelection hashtag on Twitter.

The key force behind this is the next generation, the Millennials, who elected Obama in America and may oust Ahmadinejad in Iran. They want freedom; they are sick of lies; they enjoy life and know hope.

This generation will determine if the world can avoid the apocalypse that will come if the fear-ridden establishments continue to dominate global politics, motivated by terror, armed with nukes, and playing old but now far too dangerous games. This generation will not bypass existing institutions and methods: look at the record turnout in Iran and the massive mobilization of the young and minority vote in the US. But they will use technology to displace old modes and orders. Maybe this revolt will be crushed. But even if it is, the genie has escaped this Islamist bottle.

I think the days of CNN breaking the news are over – people will share their stories themselves, bypassing the mass media conduit if necessary, and the role of the media will be to verify, organize, track, and curate the information reported via liveblogs, Twitter, etc.  The Huffington Post is doing a great job of that right now with their page on the Iran elections and subsequent fallout.

Shannon Paul’s latest post discusses how not to behave on social media sites incredibly well – in fact, I couldn’t have said it better myself.

Check it out: Don’t Be That (Social Media) Guy.

Out of the Echo Chamber

August 13, 2008

Maybe it is because August is vacation month for most of the world, but staying out of the blogging/new media echo chamber is pretty refreshing at the moment.

I think it is making me smarter more original.

Hi Freelance Switchers!

July 14, 2008

Hi FreelanceSwitch readers! 

For those of you who came here from another source, check out my post on FreelanceSwitch: Freelancers: It’s Not About You.

Color Me Surprised

June 18, 2008

I’ll admit that when I first heard about Guy Kawasaki’s Alltop*, I thought it was kind of…well, useless would probably be the most accurate word.  However, lately I’ve found it to be amazingly useful for several blogging/marketing projects – it is a great and quick way to get an overview of all the best and most relevant blogs for each topic.

*Alltop is an aggregator that collects posts from “all the top” sites on the web for a variety of topics, and they keep adding new ones.